neobedouins:

zerrie:

2013 vma will always be the best vma

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HOW COULD YOU FORGET ABOUT DAFT PUNK????!!!!!

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youbeautifulfuckingcreature:

gaystripclub:

alwaysblameitonthenargles:

I love how Snape’s just standing there like what

and slughorn is just like oh dear what should i do like he just seems so distressed 

my favorite is Dumbledore… he looks like his favorite program just came on

charl-plural:

bloodbending:

noctstiel:

bloodbending:

bloodbending:

idea: the porn olympics, where people compete to have the most nsfw stuff on their monitors as dangerously close to their parents as possible without them seeing

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GAME START

why is your dad shirtless

he’s hispanic it happens

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i win

tag-redfield:

Guys check this out, I finally have enough beard to do that thing that turns you into an instant Disney villain…

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ALADDIN GIVE ME THE LAMP

fuckyeahbookarts:

The Lost Sketchbook of Guillermo del Toro:

Filmmaker Guillermo del Toro put all his ideas for `Pan’s Labyrinth’ in a notebook — then lost it.

The heavyset man ran down the London street, panting, chasing the taxi. When it didn’t stop, he hopped into another cab. “Follow that cab!” he yelled. Guillermo del Toro wasn’t directing this movie. He was living it. And it was turning into a horror tale.

The Mexican filmmaker keeps all of his ideas in leather notebooks. And Del Toro had just left four years of work in the back seat of a British cab. Unlike in the movies, though, Del Toro couldn’t catch the taxi. Visits to the police and the taxi company proved equally fruitless.

Del Toro’s films — “Chronos,” “The Devil’s Backbone,” “Blade II,” “Hellboy” — typically feature magical realism. Fate was about to return the storytelling favor.

The cabbie spotted the misplaced journal. Working from a scrap of stationery that didn’t even have the name of Del Toro’s hotel (just its logo), the driver returned the book two days later. An overwhelmed Del Toro promptly gave him an approximately $900 tip.

The sketches and the ideas in that misplaced journal — four years of notes on character design, ruminations about plot — were the foundation of “Pan’s Labyrinth,” a child’s fantasy set in the wake of the Spanish Civil War.

The director, who at the time wasn’t even sure he’d actually make “Pan’s Labyrinth,” took the cabbie’s act as a sign, and plunged himself into the movie.

slbtumblng:

Before my Crayon ends.

FINISHED SORAKA. I tweaked some stuff after I took this photo so it’ll sit better at con, but BRING IT DRAGONCON. My gems light up, i have goat-y hooves and stand about 6’7” in them lol. Also bottom pic is make up test

p-alindrome:

let me just say a few things about ‘all about that bass’ real quick

  1. it’s a song about body positivity and we don’t get many of those so can we just take that into consideration please
  2. i know people are kicking off about her using the phrase “skinny bitches” but she does follow it up with "no, i’m just playing i know you think you’re fat / but i’m here to tell you that / every inch of you is perfect from the bottom to the top"  she’s taken an insult commonly given to slim women and basically a said so what if you are skinny/skinny but you think you’re fat, YOU’RE STILL PERFECT 
  3. i’ve seen shit loads of people saying it makes them feel more confident, and slim women get a ton of media reinforcing the idea that their body is perfect anyway
  4. IT’S CATCHY AS FUCK 

susiethemoderator:

newwavefeminism:

The automatic criminalization of black and brown bodies

and a racist.